FAQ

 

General Services

1.  How do I start services with Ferraro Behavior Services LLC?
2.  How long would it take for services to begin?
3.  What is an NOA?
4.  What is an ISP?
5.  How often would I see my consultant or therapist?
6.  What do I do if I have a problem with the delivery of my services?
 

Behavior Management 

1.  What kinds of issues would Behavior Management help me with?
2.  What are replacement behaviors?
3.  What is a Human Rights Committee and what does it have to do with my treatment?
 
 
 

General Services

 
1.  How do I start services with Ferraro Behavior Services LLC?
 
There are 2 different routes you can take.  If you have Waiver funding, you will have to contact your case manager to set up an interview with one of our consultants.  If you do not have Waiver funding you can get started working on that process by visiting the link below.  In the meantime, you can contact one of our directors to set up services through private pay.   
 
BDDS Waiver Journey - Getting started 
 
2.  How long would it take for services to begin?
 
This can depend on a number of different things.  If you have Waiver funding, your case manager would have to contact us to set up an interview.  If you decided to choose FBS as your provider, the case manager would have to make sure that we are listed as your official provider on the NOA (Notice of Action) which would give us details as to how much time we are able to spend with you and when we can get started.  Once FBS is listed on the NOA, the consultant that you chose will set up an initial meeting with you to begin services.  This could take anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months or longer.  
 
3.  What is an NOA?
 
NOA stands for Notice of Action.  This is the official document that comes from the state that details which services a client has chosen and who will be providing these services.  This also details the amount of state dollars that are allocated to each service and how many units of time the provider will be given to spend with the client.  The case manager is the person who completes the NOA with the input of the client and other team members.  
 
4. What is an ISP?
 
ISP stands for Individualized Support Plan.  This is also an official document that comes from the state that details contact information for all team members and includes basic goals that the client will work towards during the budgeted year.  Treatment methods are based off the client’s ISP to ensure that the team is working together to help the client’s progress throughout the year.  
 
5. How often would I see my consultant or therapist?
 
The NOA will list how many “units” are given to you for behavior services, music therapy or recreation therapy.  It is up to the team and the consultant/therapist to determine how to use those units to best serve the client.  This may result in the average number of units being used per month (which is preferred), or if a client is in crisis (in behavior management), this may result in a bulk of units being used at once and less units being used throughout the remainder of the budget year.  
 
6.  What do I do if I have a problem with the delivery of my services?
 
Ferraro Behavior Services, LLC wants individuals and families to feel confident in knowing the appropriate steps to initiate when a problem occurs.  FBS has a grievance policy that is given to every client with contact information and how to handle situations such as these.  Clients would contact their respective Complaint Resolution Representative by phone, email, or letter to try to work out any issues that may arise.     
 
 

Behavior Management 

 
1.  What kinds of issues would Behavior Management help me with?
 
The treatment plan for behavior management (Behavior Support Plan-BSP) would focus on identifying and decreasing problem behaviors and teaching you different more appropriate behaviors.  For example, a BSP may target: physical aggression, symptoms of depression, running away, self- injury, property destruction, symptoms of psychosis (hearing voices, paranoia), verbal aggression or non-compliance just to name a few.  
 
2.  What are replacement behaviors?
 
Replacement behaviors are more appropriate ways for you to deal with stress or anxiety.  For example, instead of hitting a staff member when you do not want to participate in an activity, your consultant may teach you to count to 10 and take a break in a secluded area until you calm down and return to the activity.  Other replacement behaviors include but are not limited to: relaxation techniques (deep breathing), coping skills (journaling), anger management techniques (talk about your frustrations), etc.  
 
3.  What is a Human Rights Committee (HRC) and what does it have to do with my treatment?
 
It is FBS policy that BSP’s with restrictive measures are the least desirable approach to supporting individuals we serve.  However, restrictive measures may be needed for individuals presenting challenging/dangerous behaviors for which nonrestrictive behavioral support plans have been attempted and documented as ineffective, especially in cases in which safety and personal health become an issue.  The HRC is a committee of volunteers who review restrictive procedures to ensure the client’s rights are being protected.  Any behavior support plan that contains restrictive measures must be reviewed and approved by an HRC committee before implementation.